YEAR 8 ASSESSMENT; LA ESPERANZA, MEXICO CITY

NAME & FORM
Is La Esperanza a Slum of Hope or a Slum of Despair?

The information overleaf is intended to represent the situation in a slum area of Mexico City and is the result of a questionnaire survey of residents who have moved from the countryside to live in La Esperanza. For people of different ages and occupations the former rural lifestyle is compared to their experiences since moving to their present home.
Your basic task is to answer the title question by presenting an analysis of the questionnaire data.
You may do some background research on living conditions in slum settlements in general, or on Mexico City in particular, to help you to understand the situation of the people.
Extra information must be clearly credited e.g. The Guardian 22.9.99 or Mexico. Jones P. (1994)

SEE STUDENT WORK ON LA ESPERANZA

You are being assessed on your enquiry and reporting skills and on your ability to identify and pose geographical questions.
For the purposes of assessment your report must be presented in five sections:

1. Present a description and explanation of the Data Tables 1 to 6 to answer the question
"Is La Esperanza a slum of hope or a slum of despair?"

2.Use the data to present one computer created graph.( N.B. This assessment sheet forms the front cover of the report so it is not necessary to present the data tables again, but some or all of the data tables may be reproduced in this section.)

3.Suggest what extra information you would need to be able to come to a firmer conclusion.

4.Say what evidence you would try to record if you were able to visit La Esperanza yourself.

5.Credit any extra information sources.

The report is to be no longer than four sides A4. It must be word processed and presented as a paper document

You will be assessed for a geography grade and an ICT level.This is a two week homework.

GRADE A*
You draw upon your knowledge and understanding to describe the interactions within and between physical and human processes. You identify links between places and show how these contribute to similarities and differences. You explain how places change over time. With very little guidance you generate your own geographical questions and select and use appropriately a wide range of geographical skills at a variety of scales (e.g. National, City, District, Individual) to draw valid conclusions from the data.

GRADE A
You draw upon your knowledge and understanding to describe how physical and human processes act together and show how these interactions produce similarities and differences between places. You recognise the links between places and offer explanations for the way in which places change You begin to identify your own geographical questions and select and use accurately a wide range of geographical skills at a variety of scales (see A*) to draw valid conclusions from the data.

GRADE B
You draw upon your knowledge and understanding to explain a range of physical and human processes and recognise that in different places the same process can have different effects. You identify relevant geographical questions. You select and make effective use of a wide range geographical skills at more than one scale(see above), and the data provided, to answer the questions.

GRADE C
You draw upon your knowledge and understanding to offer simple explanations for a range of physical and human processes and show how these processes can change the environment and lead to similarities and differences between places. You use a wide range of geographical skills at more than one scale and use evidence to draw valid conclusions, but the explanations are simple.