UPPER SIXTH KGP 20- 26
GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

UPPER SIXTH - MODULE 5
KGP 20 - 26
 
KGP 20 - 26
THE SYNOPTIC MODULE
Details of the Synoptic Module
THE SYNOPTIC MODULE TIPS
Exam tips for the Synoptic Module
Answering the DME Question Candidates are not allowed to take their annotated pre-release material in the Examination into the examination room. They are either provided with a 'clean' set of material, or additional copies of sheets that will be used directly in the examination. They will also be given the task itself.

For the task, candidates will be given a context within which they should answer the question. For example, they may be asked to imagine that they are a particular person, or have a particular role. Alternatively, they could be given a set of guidelines, which should form the basis for all of their answers. In some cases, they may even be told that they represent a certain body with a specific 'mission statement'. It is important that they empathise with this role, whatever it may be.

Candidates should remember that they:
· must treat the paper as a whole exercise, with all the questions being linked;
· must demonstrate familiarity with the data/information;
· must refer to maps and diagrams that are provided in an accurate and relevant manner;
· should draw and label their own maps and diagrams, if relevant;
· will be asked to identify problems/issues/conflicts;
· will be asked to consider a variety of proposals;
· will be asked to make a decision, and justify that decision.


As in other forms of examination it is important that candidates answer the question(s) asked, and keep a firm eve on the time. Appropriate use of the mark allocation will give an indication of the amount of time to be spent on each aspect of the DME. By their nature, the decision-making element and subsequent justification come at the end, and so it is vital that candidates leave enough time to complete the task thoroughly.

When making the final decision, they should make sure they consider all or some of the following points:
· short term and long term effects of the proposal;
· local/regional/national considerations;
· spatial impacts of each proposal;
· social, economic and environmental impacts;
· costs and benefits of each proposal;
· the effects of each proposal on different groups of people in the area.


Finally, candidates will be asked to justify their decision. This must include a strong piece of writing in favour of the chosen option(s), but may also include explanations of why the other options were rejected. They should try to avoid repetition, but make brief references back to the previous sections of the answer. They should develop the points made earlier in the context of the final decision and in the context of the role they have assumed. They should be logical, use the evidence accumulated from the rest of the exercise, and remember that the paper was conceived as a single, complete task.

Week by week content taught by Mr Phipps at
K.PHIPPS SCHEDULE - WEEKS 1-15
K.PHIPPS SCHEDULE - WEEKS 16-19
K.PHIPPS SCHEDULE - WEEKS 20-26
Week by week content taught by Mr Jackson at
C.JACKSON SCHEDULE - WEEKS 1-15
C.JACKSON SCHEDULE - WEEKS 16-19
C.JACKSON SCHEDULE - WEEKS 20-26
UPPER SIXTH RESOURCES AS/A2 CURRICULUM MAP AS/A2 SYLLABUS (PDF FORMAT)
CHESTER FIELDWORK MILAN FIELDWORK
Google
Site created by Nucleated Technology
Copyright 2002