LOWER SIXTH - KGP SCHEDULE, WEEKS 2-9 - ENERGY
MODULE 1 THE DYNAMICS OF CHANGE
10.2 PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT -POPULATION AND RESOURCES
RENEWABLE ENERGY - HEP
NON-RENEWABLE ENERGY -OIL
   
WAVE
When the wind blows over the sea surface, small ripples form. These correspond to individual gusts, they are disorganized and have no fixed direction or frequency. However, over a prolonged period of time, two things happen. Firstly, the waves interact with each other to produce longer waves, resulting in a lower frequency. Secondly, these waves are pushed yet further, giving them more energy. As long as the wind lasts, the wind will make the waves larger and the wave dynamics will create longer and longer waves. Waves will inevitably travel thousands of kilometers from the point of generation. Furthermore, as sea waves become longer (and the frequency gets smaller), they also travel faster. Waves that are created by storms are known as "swell". These waves continue across the ocean until they hit the land. Due to the waves hitting the land it has given mankind the option of harnessing that energy to create power for their own use. This is where wave power comes into play in our society today - as a renewable source of energy. Experiments with various different generators have proved that waves can provide electricity. However, many problems associated with developing and building wave powered generators that are both cheap and efficient. The main problem being that they must be strong enough to cope with storms while being light enough to work efficiently with small waves. The environmental drawback is that these schemes affect the habitat of birds and fish because they alter the tidal currents. Although, at present, two small 'shore-line' commercial wave power stations exist (in Norway and on the Scottish Island of Islay), 'offshore' generators have the potential to harness power several times greater. Yet they must be designed to withstand the power of the waves. In Western Europe, winter is a potentially the best time to harness the energy. This is due to the storm waves from the Atlantic Ocean which transfer large amounts of energy towards the coast. This is potentially a great source of energy, especially useful for generating electricity in the winter when it is in most demand.
Conclusion.
The drawbacks of WAVE power are that it alters the tidal currents, affecting the habitat of the seabirds in the area also the fish. Which are affected by the change in the tidal currents. Furthermore the wave power stations can only produce varying amounts of electricity - being dependent on the weather. But there are also good points about wave power. One good point is that the power produced is cheap. Also, making the power does not pollute the environment in the same ways that fossil fuels do.
RENEWABLE ENERGY - HEP
NON-RENEWABLE ENERGY -OIL